Sophia Le Fraga

Here Are Your Waters

The road
has at heart
your getting lost.

You must not
mind him.

Make yourself
a song of how
someone’s house
is just
ahead of you.

If you’re lost enough
to find yourself
make yourself
at home.

I weep for
what little things
could make glad.

Your destination
was the water
of the house.

Here are your waters.

Drink and be
whole again.

You Can Say It

you can say it
that way more.

come out
and rest.

for your poem-painting:
find a few important words,

and a lot of dull-
sounding ones.

your head locked into mine.
we were a seesaw.

you: an almost empty mind
for the sake of their desire

to understand.
for others that understanding

may begin, and
in doing so

be undone.

Untitled

I shook the chalk of my bones
saying: glister me forward,

soft-sigh me home.
Watching shadows crawl:

voice, come out of silence.
Say something. Appear.

Tell me: the moon said,
the salt said, your tears.

Under the waters
it usually goes.

What a small song.
I’m cold all over again.

My knees made little winds
where the light in the morning

came slowly over white snow.
It was beginning winter,

the rose had many mouths
to breathe with.

What slow clouds.
Stillness alive,

yet still through the air
in silence.

It will come again.
Be still.

________________________________________________________________

New York based Sophia Le Fraga finished her B.A. in Linguistics and Poetry at New York University. Her work has appeared in The Last Romantics, Yes Poetry, Quantum Poetry, The Stolen Island Review, Paperblög, Sole Literary Journal, The Broome Street Review, Lemon Hound, and was exhibited at the Brooklyn Museum, the Corcoran Gallery, and in 2011 throughout Berlin.

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Since 2000, The Copperfield Review has been a leading market for short historical fiction. Copperfield was named one of the top sites for new writers by Writer's Digest and it is the winner of the Books and Authors Award for Literary Excellence. We publish short historical fiction as well as history-based nonfiction, poetry, reviews, and interviews.
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