Tag Archives: Kari Bovée

An Interview With Kari Bovée

Kari Bovée is the author of Girl with a Gun – An Annie Oakley Mystery.

When and why did you begin writing, and did you always write historical fiction?

I started writing stories in the third grade. I’ve always wanted to be a writer. After college I took a job as a technical writer—which at the time I thought was soul-sucking—but, I actually learned a lot from the experience. I started writing novels when I was in my early thirties but then took a long hiatus from that to raise our children. During that time, I worked as a freelance writer from home for a couple of magazines and newsletters, etc. I just couldn’t get writing out of my system. I started writing novels again when my youngest was a junior in high school. I love historical fiction and historical mystery, but also like to write contemporary mysteries, too.

What is your latest novel? How would you describe it to potential readers?

My latest novel is Girl with a Gun – An Annie Oakley Mystery. It is what the title states, an historical mystery with Annie Oakley as an amateur sleuth. After watching a PBS American Experience special on Annie Oakley, I was impressed with the depth of her intelligence, her talent, and what she had to overcome in her early years. I love to write about empowered women in history, and Annie Oakley fit the bill. I thought she’d make a kick-ass amateur sleuth.

What makes this book different?

Instead of writing a biographical account of her life, I’ve put Annie Oakley—a famous and iconic person—into a situation she never encountered in real life. I think it’s fun to imagine how she would have reacted to being compelled to solve a murder. I took what we know of her through history and created a different reality for her.

All authors have a different path as they seek publication. What was your journey to publication like?

I’ve spent a lot of time and years working on craft and learning about the business of writing and publication. I went the traditional route for a long time. I’ve had two different agents at different times in my writing journey, but with the advent of independent publishing, I realized that traditional publishing isn’t the only path. I wasn’t quite ready to go it all on my own, so I sought out a hybrid publisher – SheWrites Press/Spark Press. So far, I’ve been really happy with the working relationship I have with them. I can make my own decisions, but have someone to guide me and help me through the publishing process. I feel like I have a good deal of control, but I don’t have to do all the millions of tasks that are required to birth a book into the world!

What are the joys/challenges of writing historical fiction for you?

I love research. I’m an academic at heart, so I love to get lost in all the details of history. I like to research historical figures and the events which made them famous (or infamous) and then try to imagine how it affected them psychologically. What motivated them? Why did they make the decisions they made? What were they thinking about when they were making history? Did they realize they were making history? What would have happened if they were faced with x situation or y characters?

What is the research process like for you?

I try to learn as much as I can about a person or event that I am writing about. The internet is a great place to start, but it’s wise to cross-reference what you are researching. The “facts” can vary. That’s why I’d much prefer to write fiction than non-fiction. It gives you some license to play with history, which is also great fun for me. You have to be accurate enough to be believable, but since the work is fiction, you have some room to be creative. I also try to find books on my subject matter or characters or try to interview historical “experts” who might know about my time period, the setting, or a person I’m researching.

Do you travel for research? If so, what role does travel play in your writing process?

Instead of coming up with an idea for a story, and then traveling to the destination where the story will take place, it usually happens the other way around for me. I travel quite a lot, domestically and internationally, and I’m often inspired by the places I’ve seen or the people I’ve learned about. Then I come home and research further. Sometimes the story requires that I go to the destination again, but I always take lots of notes and photos when I travel, so I have some good information at my fingertips.

Which authors are your inspiration—in your writing life and/or your personal life?

Gosh. There are so many. I have a degree in English Literature and still love to read the classics. I have always been inspired by the 18th and 19th century greats like Jane Austen, the Bronte sisters, Edgar Allan Poe, and Dickens. I’ve been influenced by Larry McMurtry, Anne Perry, Deanna Raybourn, Stephanie Barron, and Kerry Greenwood. Some of my recent favorites are C.W. Gortner, Cara Black, Hallie Ephron, Louise Penny, and Erika Robuck.

What advice do you have for those who want to write historical fiction?

Historical fiction has been one of the genres that go in and out of popularity. If you love history and want to write historical fiction, don’t worry about whether or not it is selling at the moment. It will always come back. Readers have a desire to know about the people and events that came before them. It helps us to understand our world today. Putting your characters, whether real or imagined, in a story that helps explain how our society has changed or not, gives people that reference. It can also provide an escape from what is currently going on in the world. History will never go out of fashion.

What else would you like readers to know?

I have three blogs where I write about my three passions in life; empowered women in history, empowered women writing, and empowered horsewomen of the world. (Go to www.Karibovee.com to access all three.) The first two are obvious, but I am also an avid horsewoman and have had horses in my life since I was 11. I’ve competed for years, and have been practicing natural horsemanship for the past decade. I consider my horses my “soul food.” They are such amazing creatures who have a depth of sensitivity and understanding that astounds me all the time. I cannot imagine my life without horses. They inspire me to be a better person and enrich my life in ways that I discover every day. They are magical!

Thanks for sharing!
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